Studio Haus is honored to announce our collaboration with IQ Capital Group and Friedman Construction.

Located in Beverly Hills, this modern masterpiece boasts regal finishes and a one-of-a-kind rooftop pool. The spacious main living room allows for a seamless flow between the lounge spaces, dining room, and kitchen. The kitchen is adorned with a fine marble countertop and backsplash as well as Miele appliances, a center island, multiple sinks, and sleek modern cabinetry. The opulent master suite spans an entire level of the home and features a fireplace, walk-in closets, luxurious bathrooms, and an open-air balcony. Studio Haus created a contemporary kitchen, 7 bathrooms, 5 closets, an entertainment center, and a bar for this lovely home. Below you can view the specifications for each of spaces on which we worked. 

Kitchen

Cabinet finish: high gloss lacquered panel in Antricita
Countertop and backsplash:
Calacatta Gold marble ¾ inch single flat edge profile
Custom fabricated marble island sink
Touch latch door/drawers: Blum tip on and Legrabox
Hafele under counter lighting
Kessembohmer accessories
Appliances:  Meile

Master Bathroom

Cabinet finish: high gloss lacquered panel in white
Channel in black aluminum
Countertop in black glass

Master Closet

Soft grey closet system
Finish: Supermatte lacquered panel in black
Countertop:  Calacatta Gold marble ¾ inch single flat edge profile

Bar

Vintage View wine peg system
Countertop:  Calacatta Gold marble ¾ inch single flat edge profile
Cabinet finish is a Supermatte panel in Antricita

Entertainment Center

High gloss lacquered panel in Black
Countertop: Black Glass

Downstairs Bar Bathroom

Cabinet finish is a Supermatte panel in Antricita
Channel in Black Aluminum
Countertop in Black Glass

Full Gallery

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Studio Haus proudly presents Zen Originals in this collaboration.

“This modern tour de force is made for entertaining. Space, light and function are artistically integrated into a designer inspired renovation. A lofty open floor plan, and sliding walls of glass showcase dazzling views from the Chavez Ravine to the pacific ocean. The perfectly sited kitchen is a stroke of genius. Thermador appliances, double oven and enormous island with jetliner views are perfect for a chef who enjoys entertaining family and friends. The master suite features an extraordinary bath and shower centered on those stunning views. I dare you to find a more impressive closet. The spacious guest bedrooms feature walk in closets and sleek bathrooms. The movie theater with wet bar and wine fridge open to a tranquil garden, dipping pool and resort style cabana with built in firepit. The attention to detail is unparalleled.” – Redfin

Product Specifications

Countertops

Black Martina marble for the backsplash and island. Blue Lagos Ceasarstone for countertops.

Cabinet Boxes

Storm Grey Melamine Upgrade

Drawers

Orion Grey Blum Legra boxes with tip on drawers for a smooth handle free drawer and door fronts

Doors

Acrylic Storm

Upper Cabinets

Blum Aventos lift mechanism

For more information about Zen Originals click the button below.


Studio Haus features bspk design inc., a full-service design company located in Santa Monica, California. Reflecting their customized design approach, the acronym “bspk” is a reference to the old English word “bespoke,” meaning tailor-made. It echoes the principals of Chris and Roman’s detail-oriented, hands-on involvement in every facet of their projects.

We had the pleasure to collaborate with bspk design on this unique single family residence in Santa Monica, CA. We provided all of the case work for the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as the build-outs for the closets. Bspk design kept a unified feel throughout the home by using a premium wood veneer Sand Ash, and offset the master closet by adding a little bling. The Sand Ash finish is very popular among white oak cabinet enthusiasts.

The kitchen cabinetry was kept completely minimalistic by using touch latch hardware which eliminated any visible cabinet pulls or knobs. All drawers are solid wood with dovetails and soft closing Blum hardware. Bspk specified Ceasarstone for the kitchen counter tops contrasting the gray with the warmth of solid walnut wood for the breakfast table and the floating shelves in the upper cabinets.

Browse the images below to view the project.

Visit the website of Bspk Design, Inc.


1. Floor To Ceiling Curtains

Hang Curtains near the top of the ceiling, not right above the windows. If you put your curtains about 1 to 3 inches from the top of the ceiling and let them go all the way down to the floor then it will make your space seem much larger.

2. Open space

Remove unnecessary clutter and adopt an open floor plan wherever possible. The presence of space in a room can dramatically change how people feel when entering.

3. Point couches toward each other

Having couches pointed toward each other instead of pointed towards a television does a wonderful job at promoting conversation. Unless of course you’re having a gathering specifically for a movie or sporting event.

4. Cover up televisions when not in use.

Find a piece of fabric that matches to color scheme of your room and place it over the television when you’re not using it. Even when a tv is not on it had a tendency to draw attention. Furthermore, the colors of the tv doesn’t usually compliment to colors of interiors. By choosing the right fabric you can kill two birds with one stone.

5. House plants

Plants are a great way to bring elements of nature into your home. If you want your interior design to seem peaceful, some strategically placed plants can do wonders. Arrange a couple of large plants next to furniture or in corners.

6. Art

Hanging art on your walls doesn’t have to be expensive and can really make your interior pop. Two important things to focus on when hanging art are size and color. Measure your space and measure your art to make sure that there is enough open space around each piece to let it shine and to not feel cluttered. Furthermore, make sure the color of the art compliments the colors of the room.

7. Mirrors

Mirrors can be used to make a small space feel larger. Secondly, mirrors placed directly across from windows can help bring in more natural light. This is particularly helpful in a room that doesn’t have many windows.  Decorative mirrors can also be used in lieu of art to fill empty wall space. Large or small, mirrors add light and dimension to your living space.

8. Rugs on wood floors

Rugs are a great way to life to wood floors. When employing rugs size is an important factor, a rug should be big enough so that every piece of furniture has at least two feet on it. If you use a rug that is too small, it can make your space feel uncomfortable. On the other hand, if its too large the space can feel claustrophobic. So take these things into consideration.

9. The Golden Ratio

In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. Interior designers often use it to ensure that the placement of objects in a room are balanced. One way to use it is to divide a space into approximately two-thirds for one section and one third for the remainder. For instance, if two thirds of the space on a floor is occupied then you should fill up one third of the space on the wall.

10. Use colors properly

The color wheel is an interior design essential. It can help you to plan your color pairings or guide you out of a design rut when you’re struggling for inspiration. Use it to help you come up with complementary schemes. This means using colors from opposite sides of the wheel.


As humanity was collectively spending more time inside, interior design and architecture grew in artistic relevance. Sophisticated materials, design elements, and perceptions of space and light became worthwhile as men and women relied less on physical work outside in the fields. Hence it is an art that first emerged in more advanced societies. Furthermore, creative explosions in interior architecture would often coincide with golden ages. In this blog, we will present an overview of interior architecture’s evolution overtime.

Greek and Roman Interiors

The first sophisticated interior designs emerged around the Mediterranean, where Greeks and later Romans invested in interior spaces to display their culture, traditions, and way of life. Romans have left mosaics and frescoes depicting mythological scenes, historic, and family events. The architecture of a Roman citizen’s home is a reflection of the social status he and his family have, but also his rank in the political and tribal hierarchies. In some ways this is still true in today’s society, because trends in design often correlate with how much wealth an individual has.

Gothic and Medieval Designs

The collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century was a set-back for all arts, including interior design and architecture. We didn’t see very much art until the 8th and 9th century, when Gothic style emerged as a mix between Germanic and Roman influences. The Medieval approach to interior design was heavily oriented towards religion. Indeed, the inside of official buildings representing an institution or a powerful lord’s authority were laid out to remind beholders of God.

Buildings sanctioned by divine authority were designed to provoke spiritual awakening or provide a comfortable environment for meditation or prayer. Patrons sponsored the best masters and craftsmen, who carved out, painted and erected the most elaborate pieces of design in human history. A rich individual would find it advantageous to associate his name and fortune with artworks that magnify human abilities for the glory of God. The ecosystem created between institutions, patrons and artists allowed countries like Italy, France and Spain (under Muslim rule) to become cradles of innovative and breathtaking architectural achievements. Materials used varied, however the proper Western European style was characterized by dark shades with materials like dark wood or stone. Marble is often used, especially for Gothic structures (Cathedral of Koln, Duomo di Milano). The spectrum of used colors varies; the north is characterized by black and white contrasts while the south integrates many secondary colors.

Baroque

When The Renaissance kicked in the near the end of the 14th century, the ecosystem previously described saw an additional source of patrons: rich merchants, soldiers and politicians that derived their power and authority from the world itself rather than divine figures. While the religious angle was preserved and experienced evolution and shifts, renaissance art was characterized by a return to nature. Baroque for example reintegrates natural elements by randomizing structures and design languages.

Baroque comes from the Portuguese word “barocco” which means “irregularly-shaped pearl”. Baroque interiors often play on contrast, overwhelming the beholder with light or darkness, brightness or blurriness. Artists were experimenting with shapes, materials and volumes, coming up with new models of interior layout. The baroque style found its full expression in Mediterranean countries and in the New World; Spanish colonial baroque characterizes the historic settlements in the Americas.

The baroque style has contaminated the neo-classical overtime, especially in Britain. Robert Adam has operated this mix in the mid-18th century. While he was working with neo-classical frameworks and overall design language, his innovative integration of baroque design elements (still life images, ribbons, medallions etc.)

Neo-Classical

The profound shift the industrial revolution brought on the European real estate market shifted interior design priorities. Habitability was increasingly becoming a focus, especially with the second industrial revolution that brought to consumers new inventions (massive electrification). 19th century interior design and architecture is mainly oriented towards neo-classicism (one of the best examples being France and the neo-classical redesign of Paris in the late 19th century). Rich owners often romantically reactivate aristocratic designs, as a clear signal of identification. The materials used are also a display of wealth, as colonial expansion provides consumers with more exotic materials.

The neo-classical approach, while apparent in France and the United Kingdom, does not characterize other countries like Italy. In the industrial north, the emergence of the liberty style is a clear return to the Renaissance spirit. While remaining classical in its structure (notably for its use of horizontal symmetry), the liberty style incorporates baroque elements and the Greco-Roman fascination for floral motives and mythological depictions.

Art Deco, Futurism, and Pop Art

Art deco would later build on this liberty style foundation. In the beginning of 20th century, Italy is experimenting a cultural shift as it is molded for the first time by a centralized national state. Internal migrations contribute to combine regional arts and techniques. Art deco is a natural result of such a phenomenon. Rome features an entire district designed and built by the art deco architect Gino Coppedè. It is the most exhaustive use of art deco design elements in a real urban setting. It is characterized by the use of arabesques (inherited from the Neapolitan neo-bourbon style), curves and shapes that insisted on transmitting an impression of movement and fluidity. It was the artistic representation of humanity’s spirit at the time: fast-paced transformations that shaped the destinies of millions like never before, alongside unprecedented technological progress.

The rise of fascism in the 1920s introduced futurism in Italian and European interior architecture. Futurism was heavily characterized by rigidity. This is apparent when when observing the dynamics of Fascist architecture. Squares and rectangles are at the center of any fascist compositions (cf. The Italian Civilization’s Museum in Rome, the Court of Justice of Milan, etc.)

Both styles did not survive the second world war. Art deco was considered vulgar while futurism was perceived as grim. The discovery of new styles thanks to the increasing European integration and the spread of the American way of life helped shape a new conception of style in Europe. Scandinavian design (with Danish and Swedish design firms gaining worldwide recognition) set the pace for an approach focused on providing an experience, a mood, rather than a simple functionality. With the influence of pop art and the 1970s, designers started to experiment with colors, materials, shapes, volumes, textures and overall structures like never before. Plastic and the advent of consumerism provided opportunities at every level to create art and innovate.

Today the myriad of interior design and architecture schools is so diverse, that willing to identify the main trends would be challenging. However, we can notice that the use of design elements in a certain way contributes to create at least bridges between somewhat similar approaches. Indeed, modern architecture has greatly valorized natural light, functionality, space optimization and connectivity. These are defining features of recently built mega-structures (Sydney opera house, Burj El-Arab, Petronas Towers etc.) and contemporary interior design. The use of glass, aluminum, steel and increasingly carbon fiber has favored this trend, especially with the rising interest for urban solar exposition.

In conclusion, design languages have varied according to the availability of materials, technological capabilities, cultural preferences and geographic necessities. While all these criteria determine how a community will organize its way of living, the social and cultural backgrounds of the elites (who were the ones building the most durable structures) were displayed through interior design and architecture. Not only to give a concrete basis to their abstract ideas (God, nature or ancestry), but also to set the pace of the entire society, as the elites’ artistic, philosophic and ethical frameworks are effectively the entire society’s references.


For a number of years Europe has been setting the standard for contemporary cabinet design.  European design maximizes clean lines and functionality. Full overlay doors are attached directly to a sturdy, thick cabinet box, eliminating the need for frames, including awkward center stiles. The advantage is that cabinet and door lines are flush and drawers can be larger because of the lack of frames so you are maximizing space. Euro-style cabinets are simple, elegant, and provide exceptional usable storage space. One of the things we do here at Studio Haus is make kitchen cabinets here in America that use a lot of the trends that are popular in Europe.

We don’t do this simply because it’s popular. This design is the best option to build cabinets that achieve an open feel. They result in a bold, clean, and streamlined aesthetic. If you want your kitchen to seem modern, contemporary, and/or trendy then you’ll likely want a kitchen that is inspired by whats currently happening across the Atlantic.

Another advantageous aspect of the current European style is high functionality. They never compromise functionality for design and spend a lot of thought figuring out ways to make a kitchen more comfortable and easier to use. They have developed new technologies that consume less space. Some of these new developments are  pull-out plate racks, specialized drawers, organized pantry units, integrated appliances, and Aventos lift systems by blum.  Furthermore, their frameless construction allows them provide more storage space than that of traditional cabinets.

Why Choose Studio Haus?

Collaboration

Collaborating on a journey of space alchemy is what we love to do. Our passion is transforming neglected areas into architectural enhancements that uplift and excite the senses.

Steadfast and Contemporary

We innovate products that integrate well into contemporary settings. Our advantage is creating the experience one gets from world renowned European kitchens, without the premium of international shipping costs and 4 month lead times.

Precise

All components of our cabinets are produced with state of the art machinery to ensure the highest quality and precision possible.

If you are looking for modern, contemporary kitchen cabinets that are inspired by European trends then call 1-888-528-2921 or fill out the form below.

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Matte kitchen cabinets have become a staple in contemporary design. Why is it that they have become so popular?

It comes down to look and feel.

A surface with a matte finish absorbs light, as opposed to reflecting light; which is what high gloss finishes do. Light absorption results in a more muted look. Since they don’t reflect light, they won’t help to make your space feel any larger, if that’s what you are trying to achieve. This was discussed in our previous blog post about the advantages of high gloss finishes.

The real advantages of matte kitchen cabinets are the look and feel. Most people find them quite ascetically pleasing and they’re very soft to the touch. When choosing this type of cabinet door you’re not necessarily making the decision because it has a lot of practical advantages. You’re doing it because they’re beautiful, and you consider your kitchen to be a work of art. If you have a large, open space to work with where you don’t need to create an illusion of more space then matte cabinets can be breathtaking. Moreover, the experience of opening and closing them is considered by many to more pleasant.

Why choose matte kitchen cabinets from Studio Haus?

Our matte cabinets are a high-tech product that has our seal of quality and exclusivity, the development has invested more than a year of research and development. We carry a revolutionary new finish, with a pleasantly soft texture, supermatte finish, and high resistance.

This new surface is characterized by increased resistance to scratching, abrasion, wet and dry heat, and superb performance and resistance to common cleaning products, compared with similar products on the market.

You can browse our selection by clicking on these two links: Textured | Flat

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Whether you’re building a new kitchen or remodeling an old one, you’re probably aware of how big of a factor the cabinet finish is. All the main styles of cabinet finish (matte, textured, veneer, & high gloss) have their advantages. So it’s not necessarily about which one is better, it’s about which one works best with your specific circumstances.

What does a high gloss finish add to a kitchen?

    1. Light reflects off the surface of the cabinet doors and gives the illusion that a space is bigger than it is. So if you’re working with a limited amount of square footage then it might be wise to choose a glossy finish.
    2. Keeping high gloss doors clean is significantly easier than most other finishes. Specifically matte and textured. Stains or marks wipe off easily with a damp, soft cloth. If you have young children then it may be wise to choose high gloss cabinet doors.
    3. High gloss cabinets come in a wider variety of styles than most other finishes. So if you’re not doing a full kitchen remodel, and just replacing the cabinets and a few other elements; it’s probably easier to find glossy finish to match what is already there. You can view some our high gloss options here. That might give you an example of the large variety of options that are possible.

Why Choose High Gloss Cabinets From Studio Haus?

Studio Haus uses a technologically advanced product that undergoes a unique industrial process which results in the outer panel having a high gloss finish, and leaves the other face coated with a decorative paper in the same design.

This product has excellent physical-mechanical response compared to other alternative products, highlighting its scratch-resistant, surface quality, high brightness as well as light stability towards colors. These characteristics make it well suited for vertical applications in kitchen, bathroom, office and home furniture.

This manufacturing process allows not only solid colors but also a wide range of designs, such as wood, marble, stone, and many others. A quality that makes it a highly versatile and decorative product.

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Sub-Zero and Miele are both incredibly high-end appliances. We’re going to take the time compare them but in all honesty, you cannot go wrong when acquiring either of these brands.

For many years Sub-Zero focused on cooking  and refrigeration while Miele focused on washers, dryers, and dishwashers. That changed recently because Miele decided to manufacture high-end refrigerators.

Miele

Miele is a German business that achieves excellence in both service and quality. Miele gained an outstanding reputation by manufacturing quality cooking appliances, laundry appliances, and dishwashers.

Something distinctive about Miele is that they assemble 90% of their appliances in one factory from start to finish. This enables them to have a very high level of quality control and, as a result, the consumer almost always gets a perfect product. It is extremely rare to receive one of their products with even the slightest imperfection.

A few years ago Miele unveiled their refrigeration lineup to the world. And to no ones surprise they are among the highest quality one can acheive. Their refrigeration is sourced from Bosch and Thermador, two very respected appliance brands.

Miele’s built-in refrigeration will be very similar to the Bosch and Thermador line, using similar hinge systems and offering the same configurations but with additional features and better quality control.

Sub-Zero

Sub-Zero is an American based business that has always manufactured refrigeration systems. They’re located in Madison, Wisconsin and are the oldest built-in refrigerator brand in the world.

For many years their dual refrigeration system was what set them apart from the pack. That system was exclusive to them and resulted in a better product than anyone else. Recently other brands have caught up to the two compressor system, one of which being the aforementioned Miele.

Sub-Zero was also the first company to make a 27″ wide column instead of the more popular 24, 30, and 36″ sizes. They did eventually introduce standard sizes in 2014.

Comparison

Both companies offer an integrated refrigerator, freezer or combination unit with a single side swing door on top and double freezer drawers, which has become popular in the design community. You can put custom cabinetry on them, or purchase stainless steel panels. Both companies have dual compressors and do a very good job at food preservation. All in all I would say that Miele is less expensive than Sub-Zero and their product is just as good.

Miele has better lighting and they have a feature known as “Remote Vision.” Miele’s Remote Vision technology creates a link between your appliance and their monitoring center. If a fault occurs, Miele’s client service center will be notified and contact you in order to gain access to your appliance to fix the problem.

However, Sub-Zero offers better filtration and spill proof shelving. The spill prevention feature on the Integrated nano shelves is achieved by applying a hydrophobic coating to the top surface of the glass. This coating repels water and other liquids, thus essentially providing a dam around the perimeter of the glass shelf. It also prevents spills from flowing off the edges of the shelf.

The air purification system is inspired by NASA technology, and has the option of an intelligently-designed internal water dispenser. Many foods release ethylene gas as they ripen and spoil. The scrubber removes the gasses off the spoiling food to keep it fresh longer.

In addition, they offer a unit with two drawers on bottom, which is a unique look over the standard Miele.


Working with an appliance specialist is the most recommended advice we can give. In fact, you’ll need to sign a waiver if you don’t! Here’s why.

There is likely not to be a more technical part of your home than the kitchen. The technology and planning for it is going to make this one room the most technical aspect of the project.

Electrical / Plumbing:

Pay close attention to where outlets need to be. Often times it’s recommended that outlets be adjacent to their respective appliance in order to allow the appliance to be perfectly flush with the cabinets. Sometimes the only way to get the appliances completely flush is to have the outlets be recessed into the wall. There can be different voltage or plug types too. Some items have ventilation requirements too. You might also need to consult with your electrician if your current electrical panel can support the new load requirements of the kitchen. You might need to add circuits, or even upgrade the panel, which can be costly.

Continuity:

A kitchen that has consistency in aesthetics and function speaks volumes. If it looks like each piece was donated from a different uncle, then it’s going be a lot more difficult to sell when the time comes.

The Fridge & Freezers:

Today’s domestic made “built in” appliances usually have an option for “Standard Installation” or “Flush Inset.” The difference is significant and will affect the aesthetics and the built out of the cabinetry. Ensure you are informed by your specialist.

Most European brands are Flush Inset. This means that the panel of the appliance is flush with the panel of the cabinets, and that you can’t even tell the difference between the two. Furthermore, don’t forget the handle detail. Some new models are now touch open and require no handle.

Provide the specifications on openings and panels as well. Consider door swing clearances, especially near walls and inside corners.

Dishwashers & Under Counter Appliances:

Dishwashers and other under counter appliances may also come panel ready, meaning a wooden door may take the place of a stainless panel and hide them away. Some items require handles, where others can be integrated with a channel.

This will usually require the ADA compliant model to allow the channel to cross above it without making the base cabinets too tall. Some new models have touch open options to avoid the need of handles should that be part of the aesthetic of the cabinets. Make sure to provide the specifications on openings and panels too.

Ovens & Tall Cabinet Appliances:

At times, you might stack a speed oven on top of a regular oven, both of which may be above a warming drawer. Stacking all these may become troublesome. Make sure you understand how these dimensions work with each other, you might need trim kits. If there are items side by side, such as a coffee machine by a microwave, inquire to their heights. They might not line up in some models.

Cooktops:

Make sure they fit in the base cabinet. A standard base cabinet interior opening is typically 1.5” less wide then its outer dimension. This means the cooktop housing will need to fit. Also, if you require a downdraft, double check to see that it will all fit.

Ventilation:

Don’t bang your head. Make sure you are aware of the relationship with the front of the cabinets and the front of the ventilation hood. If it is too low and/or sticks out too far then peeking into that rear pot might not be pleasant. If you are doing a full slab backsplash, make sure you account for the thickness of that slab before installing your hood and vent. It could get locked in and cause trouble for future service repairs.

We recommend installing the backsplash before the hood, this being able to adjust to the distance of the back wall. Also, make sure you have the right duct diameter as it might be too small for requirements and may end up extra noisy. If you’re given the option to have 30-36” clearance from the cooking surface, we vote 36”. The bigger backsplash, the better.

Island Power:

Too often we see beautiful slab waterfalls only to be pimpled by a large electrical outlet. Yes, you need power to your island per code. It’s nice to have a laptop near by when being casual. But today we have solutions to prevent this archaic approach to island power.

Plug strips, pop up power towers along with interior drawer power outlets are a few ways to correctly engineer these requirements. Or just slap an outlet right smack on the focal point.

Appliances Purchase Consideration:

Prior to cabinets going into production, we must be assured you understand the appliances you have purchased and what the final outcome of your kitchen is going to look like.

Expectations can be more accurate with informed experiences rather than assuming things will work themselves out. We never assume somebody else took care of it. This is why we urge that you request more than a receipt after your purchase.  Get all of the specifications for your appliances.

Check to see if  the options available for your appliance model aren’t ambiguous, and that you’re provided the exact specs for the way you want it. Ask for the panel specs too. The largest mistake occurs on refrigerators that have options on how they are installed. It’s affects everything. If you’re going for a high end flush install, then getting the correct trim kits and specs is paramount.